Ardent Pittite
Thanks to solemnsleep for the link!

Drawing of William Pitt by Henry Edridge, for sale at £180. This is what Stanhope says about it:
… the drawing by Edridge taken in 1801, and engraved in the course of the same year. It is a small full length, which represents Mr. Pitt in his every day attire and seated at his usual writing table. I have heard several persons who were intimate with Mr. Pitt declare themselves much struck at the faithful resemblance of this print.
Lord Stanhope, Life of Pitt, vol 4

The garment draped over the table would be the ceremonial robe of the Chancellor of the Exchequer. I hope he didn’t really just leave it lying casually around the office like that! Though I don’t actually know when he would have had occasion to wear it - maybe on state occasions like the opening of Parliament?

I’d love to think the view behind him was real - St. James’s Park, perhaps? But the “window” is all wrong for Downing Street, and in fact it probably isn’t meant to be seen as a window at all, but rather as an idealised backdrop. The actual view from the back garden of 10 Downing Street, painted in the 1730s, can be seen here.

Thanks to solemnsleep for the link!

Drawing of William Pitt by Henry Edridge, for sale at £180. This is what Stanhope says about it:

… the drawing by Edridge taken in 1801, and engraved in the course of the same year. It is a small full length, which represents Mr. Pitt in his every day attire and seated at his usual writing table. I have heard several persons who were intimate with Mr. Pitt declare themselves much struck at the faithful resemblance of this print.
Lord Stanhope, Life of Pitt, vol 4

The garment draped over the table would be the ceremonial robe of the Chancellor of the Exchequer. I hope he didn’t really just leave it lying casually around the office like that! Though I don’t actually know when he would have had occasion to wear it - maybe on state occasions like the opening of Parliament?

I’d love to think the view behind him was real - St. James’s Park, perhaps? But the “window” is all wrong for Downing Street, and in fact it probably isn’t meant to be seen as a window at all, but rather as an idealised backdrop. The actual view from the back garden of 10 Downing Street, painted in the 1730s, can be seen here.

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